IHA Daily Briefing: Jan. 11

Schreiner Named AHA Small or Rural Section Chair
Emergency Rules on SASETA Treatment/Transfer Plans
CDC: Older Women Drug Overdose Deaths Surge
First National Flu Estimates Released
Briefly Noted

Schreiner Named AHA Small or Rural Section Chair
Dave Schreiner, president and CEO, Katherine Shaw Bethea Hospital in Dixon, is the 2019 chair of AHA’s Section for Small or Rural Hospitals. AHA’s Section for Small or Rural Hospitals represents small, rural and critical access hospital members by participating in the AHA's advocacy, policy and resource development, with a particular focus on strategic opportunities.

This year, Schreiner serves as IHA’s Political Action Committee (PAC) Board of Directors Chair and IHA’s Illinois Compensation Trust (ICT) Board of Trustees Chair, and participates in other IHA committees. Previously, Schreiner was the chair of IHA’s Small and Rural Constituency Steering Committee. Active with IHA since 1998, Schreiner has participated in numerous committees, subcommittees and task forces, including the Small and Rural Education Committee, Small and Rural Annual Meeting Committee, and IHA Business Solutions Board of Directors.


Emergency Rules on SASETA Treatment/Transfer Plans
The Illinois Department of Public Health published emergency rules in the Jan. 11, 2019 Illinois Register to ensure that hospitals and pediatric health care facilities submit treatment plans to the department as soon as possible to implement provisions from P.A. 100-775. The Act significantly revised the Sexual Assault Survivors Emergency Treatment Act (SASETA) with many new requirements for hospitals as of Jan. 1.

The emergency rules include requirements and guidance to healthcare facilities concerning submission of treatment or transfer plans to the Department and encourage all healthcare facilities to submit their plans as soon as possible as the rules are now in effect.

The new forms for submission of a treatment or transfer plan can be found here (right column of the webpage). The emergency rules can be seen here (starting on page 971). Also see IHA’s memo for more details.


CDC: Older Women Drug Overdose Deaths Surge
The number of women 30 years of age and older dying from drug overdoses is skyrocketing reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data published today in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report shows that from 1999 to 2017, the drug overdose death rate among women 30 to 64 years old climbed more than 260 percent.

The report says that “drug overdose deaths involving antidepressants, benzodiazepines, cocaine, heroin, prescription opioids, and synthetic opioids all increased for women between 30 to 64 years old.” The increase in death rates by age groups were noted as:

  • A 200 percent increase among women aged 35–39 and 45–49 years;
  • A 350 percent increase among those aged 30–34 and 50–54 years; and
  • A nearly 500 percent increase among those aged 55–64 years.

A noteworthy comparison: In 2017, the death rates were highest among women 50-52 years (28.2 deaths per 100,000 population), while in 1999 the overdose death rates were highest among women aged 40–44 years (9.6 deaths per 100,000 population). Among women 30 to 64 years old, the average age at death for drug overdose deaths increased by nearly three years.

The CDC notes that educational outreach efforts have been focused on women of childbearing ages due to the risks of opioid use during pregnancy. The CDC points out that “The current analysis demonstrates the remaining need to consider middle-aged women who remain vulnerable to death by drug overdose. A multifaceted approach involving the full spectrum of care services is likely necessary.”


First National Flu Estimates Released
According to new data released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), so far during the 2018-2019 season between about 6 and 7 million people have been sick with flu. Up to half of those people have sought medical care for their illness, and between 69,000 and 84,000 people have been hospitalized from flu. This is the first time these estimates— which cover the period from October 1, 2018 through January 5, 2019— are being provided during the flu season.

The calculations are based on adjusted rates of laboratory-confirmed, influenza-associated hospitalizations collected through a surveillance network that covers approximately 8.5 percent of the U.S. population, or about 27 million people.

Based on this methodology, CDC estimates that as of Jan. 5:

  • 6.2 to 7.3 million people have been sick with flu,
  • 2.9 to 3.5 million people have been to the doctor because of flu, and
  • 69,300 to 83,500 people have been hospitalized because of flu

The weekly CDC flu surveillance reports that Illinois and 11 other states are experiencing moderate levels of influenza-like illness; 15 states and New York City are reporting high levels of influenza-like illness. Most flu strains are attributed to type A flu—H1N1 and H3N2—with some reports of type B viruses.


Briefly Noted
At the request of the Trump administration, a federal judge today issued a stay, putting a hold on the appeals process concerning a circuit court ruling that the Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional until attorneys for the federal government have funding to proceed. The appropriations act that had funded the U.S. Justice Department expired Dec. 21 as part of the partial government shutdown.