IHA Daily Briefing: Jan. 24

Tuesday, January 24, 2023
NCR/JetPay Not Making Assessment Payments
Issue Briefs on SUD Treatment Disparities, Approaches
New Recommendations on Hospitalized Adolescents
IPC: Keep Cannabis Edibles Out of Reach of Children
Illinois COVID-19 Data
Briefly Noted


NCR/JetPay Not Making Assessment Payments
The Illinois Dept. of Healthcare and Family Services (HFS) has posted a Provider Notice reminding hospitals that NCR/JetPay will no longer be available to make hospital assessment payments. HFS will be debiting hospitals’ accounts on or around Jan. 26 for the January 2023 Hospital Provider Assessment through an ACH debit originated by Well Fargo. For hospitals that have not complied with the new rules by submitting their completed ACH formsyou will be required to submit a paper check that must be postmarked by the due date of Jan. 26, 2023, in order to avoid penalties (Click here for ACH form).

Contact us with questions.


Issue Brief on SUD Treatment Disparities, Approaches
The U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services’ Office of Minority Health and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation have partnered on an issue brief focused on substance use treatment disparities among people of color and substance use treatment approaches.

This brief, “Meeting Substance Use and Social Service Needs in Communities of Color,” describes findings from a joint study that examined the experiences and practices of substance use treatment providers and their human services partners when serving people of color. The brief also summarizes common approaches the substance use treatment programs take and the challenges they face in their work.


New Recommendations on Hospitalized Adolescents
The American Academy of Pediatrics has published new recommendations on the needs of adolescents who are hospitalized. Its first policy statement on this topic was published online, yesterday.

An additional clinical report provides more detail on hospital care for adolescents who may have learning, intellectual or developmental disabilities, with an emphasis on the evaluation of their ability to participate in their care and assent to decisions.

Approximately 1.2 million, or 20%, of all U.S. pediatric hospital admissions are for adolescents between age 11 and 20. A media release underscored that teenagers may be uniquely impacted by hospitalization for acute and chronic illnesses. 


IPC: Keep Cannabis Edibles Out of Reach of Children
The Illinois Poison Center (IPC) recently shared important tips to reduce accidental pediatric ingestions of cannabis edibles following a new study recently published in Pediatrics. Researchers found of the 7,043 exposures in children ages 5 and younger from 2017-2021 the number of cases rose from 207 cases in 2017 to 3,054 cases in 2021, an increase of 1,375%.

In Illinois, cases reported to IPC in this age group increased from 5 to 232 cases in the same time period—a 4,500% increase. The majority of the increase in cases were reported during the pandemic years of 2020-2021.

As a result of the new data, IPC offered the following tips to adults on how to prevent accidental ingestion, which can be found here. Unintentional cannabis exposures in young children are increasing rapidly, as most edibles—packaged to look like common candies, chocolates and cookies—are very attractive to young children.

The study was a collaboration with IPC Medical Director Michael Wahl, MD; Marit Tweet, MD, of SIU Medicine; and Antonia Nemanich, MD, of Rush University Medical Center. To access the study, click here. For more information about IPC, click here.


Illinois COVID-19 Data
The Illinois Dept. of Public Health (IDPH) recently announced that it will follow the lead of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and shift from daily reporting of new COVID-19 cases and deaths to weekly reporting. As of Jan. 1, daily case and death data are no longer being reported. IDPH will reports weekly data on Wednesday of each week for the previous week ending Sunday. IDPH will continue daily reporting of ICU bed availability and hospital admission data.


Briefly Noted
A 2022 survey of healthcare workers in critical care settings found that over 73% of respondents have experienced on-the-job violence in the previous year, with Becker’s Hospital Review reporting 25% of respondents said “they were willing to quit because of the issue.” Becker’s said, “The most commonly reported violence was verbal abuse, such as threats (63 percent), and physical abuse, such as slapping or punching (39 percent). Patients and family members were the most common aggressors.”