IHA Daily Briefing: Nov. 15

Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2022
Register: IHA, ICAHN Advocacy Skills Training Program
IHA Comments on NSA AEOB and GFE Requirements
New Hospital Price Transparency Resources
Webinar: CDC Guidelines on Opioid Prescribing for Pain
Youth ED Visits for Suicidal Ideation Up Pre-Pandemic
Illinois COVID-19 Data
Briefly Noted


Register: IHA, ICAHN Advocacy Skills Training Program
Get the skills you need to be an effective advocate: Register for “Making Your Voice Count,” an advocacy training program offered by IHA and the Illinois Critical Access Hospital Network (ICAHN). Advocacy experts from IHA and ICAHN will lead the training, with guest speakers from state and federal government, health policy, lobbying, and hospitals and health systems participating in sessions on:

Dec. 7, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: “The Importance of Advocacy: Introduction to the Legislative and Policymaking Process;”
Feb. 8 and March 8, from 1-2 p.m.: “Relationships Matter” (webinars); and
June 14, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: “Sustaining Advocacy Functions and Activities.”

Program participants will also join other hospital leaders and IHA leaders on IHA Advocacy Day in the spring. The specific date will be announced. Advocacy Day will be in person and the February and March sessions will be offered virtually. You can attend the opening and closing seminars (Dec. 7 and June 14) in person or virtually. In-person attendance will be at IHA’s Naperville and Springfield offices and ICAHN headquarters in Princeton. 

The training is designed for hospital leaders regardless of advocacy experience, including:

  • CEOs;

  • Executive leaders;

  • Hospital trustees;

  • Marketing directors;

  • Community affairs directors; and

  • Government relations directors.​

Registration discounts are available when three or more individuals from a member organization register. See our program flyer and register today.

Contact us with questions.


IHA Comments on NSA AEOB and GFE Requirements
Today, IHA submitted comments to the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services, Labor and Treasury (the Departments) on advanced explanation of benefits (AEOB) and good faith estimate (GFE) requirements under the No Surprises Act (NSA).

IHA urged the Departments to implement AEOB and GFE processes that build off current claims transaction systems in an effort to minimize implementation costs and ensure the secure transfer of patient data. Additionally, we asked the Departments to evaluate current price transparency tools and eliminate any requirements that are duplicative and fail to advance healthcare price transparency.

Read the comment letter on IHA’s price transparency webpage.


New Hospital Price Transparency Resources
Yesterday, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released new guidance to assist hospitals in complying with Hospital Price Transparency requirements.

In response to public comments and input from a technical expert panel, CMS made available for download three sample format files to assist hospitals with the required machine-readable file of standard charges. CMS also created a data dictionary to supplement these sample files. The data dictionary includes definitions, data types, formats and valid values for the data elements hospitals must include in their machine-readable files.

These resources and more are available on CMS’ Price Transparency website.


Webinar: CDC Guidelines on Opioid Prescribing for Pain
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) 2022 CDC Clinical Practice Guideline provides 12 voluntary recommendations for managing acute, subacute and chronic pain. This Thursday, a CDC webinar will provide an overview of the CDC recommendations; implementation principles; and approaches to maximize benefits and minimize risks when starting, continuing, or discontinuing opioids for pain. The webinar will take place from 1-2 p.m. and login information can be accessed by clicking here.


Youth ED Visits for Suicidal Ideation Up Pre-Pandemic
Illinois emergency departments (EDs) have seen a spike in visits from children and teens ages 5 to 19 presenting with suicidal thoughts or ideas—an increase that data show began before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. The study draws renewed attention to the nation’s youth mental health crisis, which the U.S. Surgeon General officially declared in 2021 in response to the rise in rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts among children.

Researchers from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago found that visits to the ED for suicidal ideation among children and teens increased 59% overall from 2016-17 to 2019-21. There was a corresponding increase from 35% to 44% of cases in which suicidal ideation was coded as the principal diagnosis. Hospitalizations of children for suicidal thoughts also increased 57% between fall 2019 and fall 2020. Click here to read the full study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

National data confirm that suicide is the second-leading cause of death among children and adolescents in the U.S., and has increased more than 50% over the past two decades. Studies show that individuals who experience suicidal thoughts are more than three times more likely to die by suicide in the future than individuals who don’t have suicidal thoughts. Though this study focused on Illinois data, study authors emphasized that the diverse demographics of Illinois’ population is representative of the nation’s general population.


Illinois COVID-19 Data
To access updated Illinois COVID-19 data on daily case numbers, testing outcomes and deaths, click here. Hospitalization data, including the number of patients in the ICU and patients on ventilators, can be accessed by clicking here. The most recent COVID-19 vaccination data can be found by clicking here. The Illinois Dept. of Public Health (IDPH) updates its COVID-19 data at 1 p.m. Monday – Friday.


Briefly Noted
The COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE) will remain in effect until at least mid-January, as the Biden administration has not notified states and health providers of any plans to lift the PHE. The U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services (HHS) promised to give stakeholders 60 days’ notice if it intended to let the PHE expire, and that deadline was Friday.

“The COVID-19 Public Health Emergency remains in effect, and as HHS committed to earlier, we will provide a 60-day notice to states before any possible termination or expiration,” an HHS spokesperson confirmed, according to recent media reports.