IHA Daily Briefing: Sept. 11

New Requirements in Healthcare Violence Prevention
Oct. 4 Deadline for SANE Training Nov. 5-7
CMS Urged to Reduce Medicare Administrative Burdens
Briefly Noted

New Requirements in Healthcare Violence Prevention
IHA today sent members a detailed summary and update on the “Health Care Violence Prevention Act” (House Bill 4100), which was unanimously passed by both chambers of the Illinois General Assembly and was signed by the Governor on Aug. 24. The new law, Public Act 100-1051, becomes effective Jan. 1, 2019.

The goal of the Health Care Violence Prevention Act is to outline specific responsibilities and procedures for healthcare providers and law enforcement to more effectively ensure the safety of healthcare workers in hospitals while providing care to “committed persons” (e.g., persons in the criminal justice or juvenile justice systems). The legislation was introduced by the sponsor in response to a violent hospital incident in her district. IHA worked with the sponsor throughout the spring session to mitigate the significant regulatory and compliance concerns IHA had with the original bill. IHA supported the final agreed upon language and worked closely with the bill’s sponsor, as well as other affected stakeholder groups, including healthcare unions and law enforcement.

See IHA’s memo here, which covers major components and requirements of the new law; hospitals are also encouraged to review the entire Act.


Oct. 4 Deadline for SANE Training Nov. 5-7
The Illinois Office of Attorney General (OAG) will be offering Adult/Adolescent Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Training Nov. 5 -7 from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. at Edward Hospital in Naperville. This program counts toward the certification requirements to become a SANE.

Sixteen hours (two days) of the Adult/Adolescent SANE training are to be completed online prior to the 24-hour (three day) classroom component. Instructions regarding the online component will be released on Oct. 4, and students must complete the online coursework by Nov. 1.

Applicants must:

  • Have a license in good standing;
  • Have a minimum of one year of clinical experience;
  • Acknowledge the requirements of the training (including submitting a recent resume); and
  • Complete the 14 hours of online training and homework by Nov. 1.

Public Act 100-775 signed by the Governor on Aug. 10, will require sexual assault treatment hospitals to have 24/7 SANE-trained nurses available to treat all sexual assault survivors by Jan. 1, 2022. See IHA's memo for further information.

Applications are due Oct. 4. Questions about the program can be emailed to: SANE@atg.state.il.us.


CMS Urged to Reduce Medicare Administrative Burdens
Last week, U.S. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady (R-TX) and Subcommittee on Health Chairman Peter Roskam (R-IL) requested that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) continue to reduce Medicare administrative and regulatory burdens currently imposed on hospitals, post-acute providers and physicians. In letters addressed to CMS Administrator Seema Verma, the committee leaders urged CMS to streamline the Medicare Conditions of Participation, establish flexible guidelines for co-location arrangements, overhaul the hospital quality star ratings and conduct more comprehensive quality measure reviews.

In August, the chairmen released a report reviewing the committee's work and including the next steps to deliver relief from unnecessary regulations and mandates that impede innovation, increase costs and provide no assistance in the improvement of quality care to Medicare beneficiaries.


Briefly Noted
Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new clinical recommendations for healthcare providers treating children with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), often referred to as concussion. The CDC Guideline on the Diagnosis and Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Among Children, published in JAMA Pediatrics, is based on the most comprehensive review of the science on pediatric mTBI to date—covering 25 years of research. Offering 19 sets of clinical recommendations that cover diagnosis, prognosis, and management and treatment, the CDC Pediatric mTBI Guideline is applicable to healthcare providers in all practice settings.

Researchers have coined a new term that describes those with pain lasting three months or longer and accompanied by at least one major activity restriction—High Impact Chronic Pain (HICP), affecting approximately 11 million adults in the U.S. A study, published in the Journal of Pain, found that people suffering from chronic pain experience a progressive deterioration in mental and physical health outcomes along with substantially higher healthcare usage. About 83 percent of people with HICP were unable to work for a living, and one-third had difficulty with self-care activities such as washing themselves and getting dressed. These findings directly address recommendations suggested in the National Pain Strategy by more accurately characterizing the HICP population to further understanding of chronic pain.

Last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Cassipa (buprenorphine and naloxone) sublingual film (applied under the tongue) for the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. This action provides a new dosage strength (16 milligrams/4 milligrams) of buprenorphine and naloxone sublingual film, which is also approved in both brand name and generic versions and in various strengths. The FDA says that Cassipa should be used as part of a complete treatment plan that includes counseling and psychosocial support and should only be used after patient induction and stabilization up to a dose of 16 milligrams of buprenorphine using another marketed product. Read more here.